Lads and lexapro – men get depressed too

Men-and-Mental-Health-Stigma3

Not long ago I attended a hen do, where after a few cocktails and some loosened tongues, it transpired that over 50% of the group were taking antidepressants. Even someone with maths skills as questionable as mine can figure out that’s an astonishingly large chunk of the room.

I’ve never had any problems talking to other women about my past anxiety and depression issues – in fact very often instigating such a conversation has led to some knowing nods, the sharing of similar experiences, and maybe even a few tears and a cuddle. It’s comforting, cathartic and a really important part of the healing process.

My male friends that have experienced anxiety and depression issues (not many, that I’m aware of anyway) have been a lot less open about their difficulties. Often I’ve only learned of the problem after the worst of it has passed, or through a flurry of emails or text messages. Talking face-to-face about emotional stuff has never been a strong suit for the dudes in my life.

I could burn a hole in my keyboard ranting about all the different corners of life and modern society in which men have unfair advantages and privilege – but mental health isn’t one of them. We are failing men that fall into the mental illness abyss. Overall there are fewer men than women who suffer from anxiety disorders and clinical depression, but those that do are at much higher risk of killing themselves – the male rate of suicide in the UK has increased significantly since 2007 and in 2013 78% of all UK suicides were in men.

It’s a bizarre gender paradox – with women experiencing higher rates of suicide ideation, and actually attempting suicide more than men; and yet we end up with men being those most likely to successfully take their own lives. What happens in-between the onset of male depression and these tragic deaths? Not enough talking, certainly.

It’s widely accepted that a higher proportion of women will go through clinical depression in their lifetime, than men. Hormones, people. Balancing child-birth and motherhood with trying to have a career. THE PATRIARCHY. The amount of crap we have to put up with in modern society means it’s hardly surprising that so many women turn to happy pills – and this acceptance of our vulnerability makes it easier to talk about things like depression. It’s easier to ask for help.

Not so for men, who are still generally expected to lock up their emotions and get on with it. Sensitivity in men is still construed as weakness. Even I’ve been guilty of jokingly telling a friend to ‘man up’ before, such is the ingrained nature of our societal disdain for male emotional expression and loss of control – qualities we associate with women. Most guys don’t openly talk about their feelings with each other, in the same way that females do, and depression and dark thoughts can fester until they reach crisis point.

However the stereotype that men don’t want to ask for help can’t be very accurate – you just have to look at the number of calls fielded by helplines for men, set up by organisations like Campaign Against Living Miserably – a charity dedicated to preventing male suicide in the UK. It’s painfully obvious that, given the right environment, dudes want to talk.

Suicide is now the biggest killer of men under 50 here in the UK. Even while truck-loads of artery-clogging bacon sandwiches are scoffed every day, and mind-bogglingly dangerous drivers freely roam the roads, this is what’s killing our men. It’s staggering.

We need to get more comfortable with men exploring their emotional needs and better managing their own mental health, especially in the face of continued mental health cuts across the NHS. If we can get more men to talk more about how they feel; go public with their issues and share their experiences of anxiety and depression, not only would this be a direct challenge to the stigma that hounds male mental illness but it might just help to save the lives of other men that are suffering in silence.

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4 thoughts on “Lads and lexapro – men get depressed too

  1. Thanks for posting this. I’ve been posting about my Depression for over two years now. And of all the people who’ve come forward to contact me and talk about their own mental health issues or even just offer support, the ratio of men to women would be about 1:99. Even the few men who have posted about their depression and I’ve tried to reach out to them, I find most a lot less communicative than women. It’s a big stigma, I mean, even I don’t talk about my problems with most of my circle; even those who know what’s going on with me usually sidestep the issue. This issue needs to be aired a lot more than it is being, because, like you said, pushing it down is leading more and more of us to suicide, one area where we seem to be much more successful than women.

    • Thanks for sharing your story. It’s one area that really highlights how feminism can help men, I think. By de-stigmatising all these emotional qualities – sensitivity, openness, vulnerability etc – which we usually associate with women, we should be able to help society to accept that there’s a lot of strength in honest self expression. It’s not un-manly to cry. Well done for even trying to reach out those suffering – it’s so important!

      • It’s funny, but growing up I had no or little concept of gender differences. I never saw women as weak or men as inherently strong. I don’t know why that was so. But controlling my emotions, rather suppressing them was second nature to me, still is.

  2. Pingback: Lads and lexapro – men get depressed too | The Life and Times of a Clinical Depressive

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